Victorian and Queensland Parliament Houses

Victorian and Queensland Parliament Houses

Especially noteworthy in the Vestibule of the Victorian Parliament building is the intricate mosaic of Minton floor tiles, one roundel of which bore the words from Proverbs 11:14 `Where no Counsel is the People Fall; but in the Multitude of Counsellors there is Safety’.

Victorian Parliament House
In 1876 a Parliamentary Select Committee recommended that work recommence on Parliament House and a year later a Royal Commission was formed to oversee further construction. It recommended certain changes, the most important of which was the replacement of a projected tower by a large dome and the appointment of Peter Kerr as architect in charge.

In 1877-9 work proceeded on the Grand Hall (renamed in 1887 Queen’s Hall, after Queen Victoria) and the Vestibule. This had the effect of filling the empty space between the chambers and the Library.

Queen’s Hall was used for parliamentary receptions and formal banquets, while the Vestibule offered a formal entry to the expanding building.

Especially noteworthy in the Vestibule was the intricate mosaic of Minton floor tiles, one roundel of which bore the words from Proverbs 11:14

Where no Counsel is the People Fall; but in the Multitude of Counsellors there is Safety

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source :  https://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/about/the-parliament-building/history-of-the-building

 

Queensland Parliament House

The lobby floor of the Queensland Parliament House is made from original Minton tiles imported from England and imitation marble. Some other features of the formal entrance area include: highly decorative plasterwork; leadlight glass windows; wrought iron banisters; hand carved wooden details; and polished parquetry floor around the base of the grand staircase.

This staircase leads from the ground floor entrance to the Legislative Assembly Chamber and the Members’ Reading Room on the first floor, and then to the visitors’ galleries and the O’Donovan Library on the second floor.

Four small stained glass windows adorn the two lower levels of the staircase. The two ground floor windows feature text from The Bible, Psalm 127-1, stating:

Except the Lord build the house, they labour but in vain that build it.
Except the Lord keep the city, the watchman waketh but in vain.

This text was chosen by Mrs Elizabeth Emily O’Connell (nee le Geyt), who was the wife of Sir Maurice Charles O’Connell, the second President of the Legislative Council.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: https://www.parliament.qld.gov.au/explore/history/parliament-house/inside-parliament-house/entrance-staircase

The Bible is a mainstay of Western life
http://www.onlineopinion.com.au/view.asp?article=18926&page=0

See also  
Bible Society Australia : https://atributetoaustralianchristians.wordpress.com/2017/03/20/bible-society-australia/

Lord’s Prayer at the opening of Federal and State Parliaments : https://atributetoaustralianchristians.wordpress.com/2017/03/26/lords-prayer-at-the-opening-of-federal-and-state-parliaments/

______________________________
Leave a Reply, comments are welcome.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Further material. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s