Elizabeth Ward

Elizabeth Ward (1842 – 1908) worker
Gentle but resolute, Elizabeth was a ‘most indefatigable worker’. Having helped to found the ladies’ committee of the Sydney City Mission, she organized midnight suppers for prostitutes and distributed cards inviting them to call on her when ‘in need of advice or sympathy’.  From 1889 she campaigned for, and wrote pamphlets on, female suffrage as a Christian duty and a means to temperance.

Elizabeth Ward worked for the Sydney Ladies’ United Evangelistic Association and for the committees of G. E. Ardill’s Jubilee Home and Registry Office for Young Women, the Queen’s Jubilee Fund and the third Australasian Conference on Charity (1891-92); she also joined the National Council of Women of New South Wales. A member of the Women’s Federal League, she wrote letters to the newspapers advocating Federation.

Gentle but resolute, Elizabeth was a ‘most indefatigable worker’. Having helped to found the ladies’ committee of the Sydney City Mission, she organized midnight suppers for prostitutes and distributed cards inviting them to call on her when ‘in need of advice or sympathy’. As superintendent of the mission’s biblewoman for the Rocks district, she publicized the ‘terrible reality’ of sweating and the poor’s need for material as well as spiritual succour. After 1901 she assisted the elderly to apply for old-age pensions.

Ward was a member of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union of New South Wales from 1884; she was later a vice-president and life member. From 1889 she campaigned for, and wrote pamphlets on, female suffrage as a Christian duty and a means to temperance. Joining the short-lived Women’s Suffrage League of New South Wales in 1890, she became colonial superintendent of the W.C.T.U.’s franchise department in 1892; in addition, she took charge of the evangelistic and press departments.

Her autobiography, Out of Weakness Made Strong (1903), revealed her conviction of divine direction. She believed that women had ‘a distinct and separate point of view’, with ‘their own homes to protect, and special wrongs to right’. Her work was motivated by a belief in the spiritual sisterhood of all women.

Source : http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/ward-elizabeth-jane-8980

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