John McEncroe

John McEncroe (1794 – 1868) Catholic priest, educationist, newspaper editor
In Sydney, McEncroe was a familiar figure on the public platform. In his forthright, racy style he advocated the rights of workers and opposed the demands of the squatters on such issues as the Constitution, the revival of transportation, and land policy. He was a prominent member of benevolent societies, whether religious or secular, and a pioneer and apostle of the temperance movement.

In 1832, Father McEncroe became the official chaplain of the Catholics of Australia. During his first ten years in the colony McEncroe spent much of his time and energy caring for convicts with whom he had considerable influence. He volunteered for Norfolk Island where he was chaplain from 1838 to 1842. Towards the end of his chaplaincy his concern for the convicts increased; he was strenuously opposed to the entire system of transportation because it failed to reform the convict and brought social and political evils to the colony.

In Sydney, McEncroe was a familiar figure on the public platform. In his forthright, racy style he advocated the rights of workers and opposed the demands of the squatters on such issues as the Constitution, the revival of transportation, and land policy. He was a prominent member of benevolent societies, whether religious or secular, and a pioneer and apostle of the temperance movement.

For many years the direction of Catholic education was his responsibility. His most valuable contribution in this field was the introduction of the Sisters of Mercy and the Marist Brothers into his parish schools.

Source : http://www.sydney.catholic.org.au/about/history/McEncroe.shtml
also
http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/mcencroe-john-2398

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