Patricia Brennan

Patricia Brennan (1944 – 2011) doctor, missionary, leader of movement of ordination of women
Like many women missionaries, Patricia Brennan had seen the widespread violence that was perpetrated against women and had also achieved an independence that was not appreciated in the Anglican diocese of Sydney. She committed herself to nurturing women’s spiritual freedom and physical health. She was a charismatic leader and in the struggle to have women ordained as priests and bishops in the Anglican Church in Australia, she galvanised supporters, banished their fears and inspired laughter and hope.

Patricia Brennan was born Patricia Anne Wilkinson on April 15, 1944, one of three girls to George Wilkinson, a compositor, and his wife, Eileen Nugent, a hospital matron. She grew up in a cottage in Hurstville and went to Hurstville Public School then St George Girls High School, where her delight in ideas, skill in debating, love of poetry, incipient feminism and sense of the dramatic were nurtured. While she might have been drawn to Portia, her Lady Macbeth passed into legend.

She won a Commonwealth scholarship to the University of Sydney, where she studied medicine, graduating in 1968. After serving her internship, she worked as senior resident at a number of hospitals until 1970.

By then she had met Rob Brennan – in 1968, they were both counsellors at an Anglican mission. Patricia went off to work as a missionary physician and surgeon at the Sudan Interior Mission Hospital in Jos, Nigeria, and Galmi surgical and obstetric hospital in Niger, while Rob stayed in Sydney. They married in 1971 and then went to Nigeria, where Rob, a mathematician and actuary, taught and Patricia again worked as a doctor with the mission. They also spent time in Canada, the US and Britain.

The couple returned to Australia in 1973 and Brennan was the haematology registrar at Prince of Wales Hospital and the general-practice consultant for the Sudan Interior Mission headquarters. In 1977, she established a solo general practice at Summer Hill, which she maintained until 1986.

Years of struggling against fundamentalism in the mission society had radicalised her. Like many women missionaries, she had seen the widespread violence that was perpetrated against women and had also achieved an independence that was not appreciated in the Anglican diocese of Sydney. She committed herself to nurturing women’s spiritual freedom and physical health.

She was a charismatic leader and in the struggle to have women ordained as priests and bishops in the Anglican Church in Australia, she galvanised supporters, banished their fears and inspired laughter and hope.

Source : http://www.smh.com.au/national/obituaries/faithful-doctor-fought-for-women-20110407-1d615.html#ixzz1N9G7VOKL

An interview with Patricia, filmed less than three months before she died aged 66 of pancreatic cancer. A former missionary doctor come feminist theologian, Patricia is best known for her very public role in the fight for the ordination of women in Australia – a country which now has 400 Anglican women priests, 200 deacons, and two women bishops. What’s less known about Patricia is that she was also a specialist in forensic medicine, and most of her work in recent years dealt with sexual violence against women and children. A moving biopic of an extraordinary woman of our time.

Refer :  http://www.abc.net.au/compass/s3202785.htm

Refer also http://www.melbourne.anglican.com.au/NewsAndViews/TMA/Pages/2011/2011-04/Women-clergy-pioneer-dies.aspx

______________________________
Leave a Reply, comments are welcome.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Christians. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s