John Gleadow

John Gleadow (1801 – 1881) lawyer, politician
 In 1826, John Gleadow became Launceston’s first legal practitioner.  John Gleadow joined the Wesleyan Church in 1834 and soon became secretary and superintendent of its Sunday school. He was also treasurer of its Missionary Society, an active supporter of the Cornwall Auxiliary Bible Society, a founder of the Town Mission and a member of the Launceston Benevolent Society.

Gleadow had wide business and civic interests. Although he failed to secure an additional grant in 1831 through non-residence, he purchased much land in northern Tasmania, won recognition as an able farmer and supported horticultural and agricultural societies. An able judge of horses, he helped to found the Cornwall Turf Club in the early 1830s and later turned to the importation of draught stallions. He was a foundation director of many companies, including the Cornwall Bank, established in 1828 with him as its first solicitor; when its doors were temporarily closed after four years, he joined the shareholders’ committee that overcame its difficulties.

In 1833 he helped embarrassed businessmen to draft a petition for the appointment of a competent officer in Launceston to take affidavits of debt and to issue writs against absconding debtors. He also served on many committees for raising and distributing philanthropic funds, for building and improving roads and shipping facilities, and for adjusting quitrents on free land grants.

Gleadow joined the Wesleyan Church in 1834 and soon became secretary and superintendent of its Sunday school. He was also treasurer of its Missionary Society, an active supporter of the Cornwall Auxiliary Bible Society, a founder of the Town Mission and a member of the Launceston Benevolent Society.

He served on the Infant School Board in 1834, helped to build a chapel and school room at Morven (Evandale) and joined the management committee of St John’s Hospital. From 1855 to 1861 he was a leading member of the board of education and in 1867 was chairman of a commission of inquiry into the management of the Queen’s Asylum for destitute children.

In politics Gleadow did not at first support the anti-transportation movement, but later became an ardent advocate. He was also active in the struggles to end state aid to churches and to gain representative government. When representation was won in 1851, he presided at the celebration dinner in Launceston and tried without success to postpone the execution of three criminals on that day. After the abolition of transportation he encouraged bounty immigration. At the first elections for the Legislative Council he was returned unopposed for Cornwall and became chairman of committees.

Complerte article :  http://www.adb.online.anu.edu.au/biogs/A010414b.htm

Lord’s abode evolves with new building
Built in the mid-1800s by John Gleadow, the new Bible House at 116a St John Street, Launceston, is considered ‘‘a gift from God’’ for Bible Society Tasmania. In 1826, Mr Gleadow became Launceston’s first legal practitioner and lived in the building in front of the new Bible House.

It is believed the prominent Tasmanian had outgrown the front building and decided to build another building at the rear. Mr Gleadow had a remarkable connection with Bible Society Tasmania, as he was a keen Christian and a passionate member of the society. In 1832 the Cornwall Auxiliary Bible Society was set up in Launceston, of which Mr Gleadow was a founding member and on the first committee.

Over the past century and a half, the new Bible House building has been used for many diverse purposes including a residence, engineering company, a clothing factory and an undertakers during the 1900s.

The hearse of former Tasmanian premier and Australia’s tenth Prime Minister Joe Lyons, left from this building in 1939.

http://www.biblesociety.com.au/pdf/28feb10(1).pdf
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Image (above) source : http://www.parliament.tas.gov.au/history/tasparl/gleadowj95.htm

Enid Lyons : https://atributetoaustralianchristians.wordpress.com/2010/10/27/enid-lyons/

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