Richard Bardon

Richard Bardon (1886 – 1969)  minister, community worker
Over almost a quarter of a century Richard Bardon traversed an area that spread from Proserpine to Sarina, sharing and leading in the pioneering work of church and society. In the same manner as the Bardons had assisted the Mackay community to recover from the losses of World War I and the cyclone damage of 1918, they responded during the Depression to the needs of the unemployed in practical and sensitive ways. He held affection for country folk, helped the disadvantaged, and showed concern for single mothers and for the mentally ill. Outside his pastoral responsibilities, he contributed to the local newspaper and radio, and captained the town’s cricket team.

Richard Bardon, taught for six years in Queensland state primary schools, before studying at the University of Sydney (B.A., 1912). Close contact during his youth with the Presbyterian clergyman Peter Robertson attracted Bardon to the ministry; he was later to describe Robertson as ‘caring for the widow and the orphan in the day of trouble—and for many days afterwards’. In 1912 Bardon entered the Presbyterian Theological Hall within Emmanuel College, University of Queensland. On 21 January 1913 he married a schoolteacher Elsie Mary Florence Watson (d.1966) at the Park Church, Glenelg Street, South Brisbane; they were to have four children.

Following his student pastorate at Bald Hills, Bardon was ordained in late 1914 and settled in the parish of Killarney. There he developed a distinctive ministry characterized by ‘a deep insight into human problems and a strong pastoral sense’. In 1920 he responded to a call to Mackay where he and his family were to stay until 1944. Over almost a quarter of a century he traversed an area that spread from Proserpine to Sarina, sharing and leading in the pioneering work of church and society. In the same manner as they had assisted the Mackay community to recover from the losses of World War I and the cyclone damage of 1918, the Bardons responded during the Depression to the needs of the unemployed in practical and sensitive ways. He held affection for country folk, helped the disadvantaged, and showed concern for single mothers and for the mentally ill. Outside his pastoral responsibilities, he contributed to the local newspaper and radio, and captained the town’s cricket team.

Bardon lectured to theological students in 1918, 1929 and 1950-52, and was acting-principal (1929) of Emmanuel College and chairman (1949-51) of its council. In 1933 he was elected moderator of the Presbyterian Church of Queensland and was clerk of its assembly in 1944-57; he was also moderator-general (1951-54) of the Presbyterian Church of Australia and, with other church leaders and prominent jurists, was a signatory to the 1951 ‘Call to the People‘ which aimed to promote moral values in society. Having served in the Brisbane parishes of Wilston (1944-48) and Kalinga, he retired in 1952 and was appointed O.B.E. in 1954. He had edited (1945-50) The Presbyterian Outlook, completed The Centenary History of the Presbyterian Church of Queensland (1949) and was to write a perceptive biography, James Gibson MA, DD (1955): his clear style was strengthened by discerning comment and enlivened by wit.

Source : http://adbonline.anu.edu.au/biogs/A130132b.htm

Also

The Centenary History of the Presbyterian Church of Queensland
Richard Bardon
http://www.biblioz.com/search.php?a=88&i=53528799&Id=199390672&page=

An image of the book cover is shown above

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