Samuel Barraclough

Sir Samuel Barraclough (1871 – 1958) mechanical engineer
Sir Samuel Barraclough was appointed professor of mechanical engineering in the University of Sydney in 1915. He was dean of the faculty of engineering in 1924-33 and 1936-41, and a fellow of the senate in 1925-33 and 1938-56. For twenty years he was chairman of the Australian Student Christian Movement.

Sir Samuel Barraclough, mechanical engineer, was born on 25 October 1871 in Sydney, eldest son of William Henry Barraclough, clerk, and his wife Hannah Arabella, née Egerton. He was educated at Sydney Boys’ High School and the University of Sydney (B.E., 1892). Awarded an 1851 Exhibition travelling scholarship, he attended Sibley College of Engineering, Cornell University, United States of America (M.M.E., 1894), and while there was an editor of the Sibley Journal of Engineering.

Barraclough published numerous articles, often connected with steam engines and boilers, in the engineering journals and the Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales; his Abridged Mathematical Tables … (1907) was republished several times. In 1901-02 he was founding president of the Sydney University Engineering Society. Lawrence Hargrave consulted him in 1908 about a suitable engine for his planned ‘lightest and most compact’ flying machine. Despite being granted the right of private practice in 1904 and promotion to assistant professor in 1908, he applied unsuccessfully in 1909 for the chair of engineering at the University of Melbourne. He was president of the Engineering Association of New South Wales in 1914-15.

In October 1899 Barraclough had been commissioned in the Corps of Australian Engineers; in 1908 he transferred as captain to the Australian Intelligence Corps. Promoted major in 1914, he served with Intelligence as senior assistant censor until the end of 1915 when he visited India, Egypt, France and Great Britain on behalf of the Commonwealth government.

In his report he advised that ‘the best way of helping the British munitions effort and the future inauguration of the Australian arsenal would be to send to Great Britain … as many Australian workers as possible’. At the end of 1916 he returned to London as honorary lieutenant-colonel in charge of the Australian munitions workers in England and France. By 1918 some 5000 skilled men had reached England and he had built up a staff of about 150 to look after the men’s welfare and discipline. At the end of the war Churchill praised ‘the great success of a unique scheme’. Barraclough was appointed C.B.E.

Barraclough had been appointed professor of mechanical engineering in the University of Sydney in 1915. He was dean of the faculty of engineering in 1924-33 and 1936-41, and a fellow of the senate in 1925-33 and 1938-56. An interesting teacher and good administrator, he had a profound influence on the advancement of engineering education.

He had an infectious enthusiasm for research and worked hard to foster travelling scholarships. Dignified and immaculately dressed, he was careful of speech, cheerful and kindly.

For twenty years he was chairman of the Australian Student Christian Movement.

Complete article : http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/barraclough-sir-samuel-henry-egerton-5141

Australian Student Christian Movement : http://www.ascm.org.au/

Sir Samuel Barraclough portrait : http://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/person.php?LinkID=mp78697

Biographical information sourced from the Bright Sparcs on-line biographical register
Professor Sir Samuel Henry Egerton Barraclough (1871-1951) Graduated with a Bachelor of Engineering from University of Sydney in 1892. Postgraduate study at Cornell University, 1894. Assistant lecturer in Mechanical Engineering, University of Sydney 1897-1907, assistant professor 1908-1914, professor of Mechanical Engineering 1915-1941, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering 1924-1933 and 1936-41, fellow of University Senate 1925-1933, 1938-1956. President of a number of societies, including Engineering Association of NSW (1914-15), engineering section Royal Society of NSW, Institute of Engineers Australia (IEA), ANZAAS, received the Peter Nicol Russell Memorial Medal from the IEA, 1939. During WWI, Barraclough conceived of and oversaw the implementation of a scheme whereby 5000 Australian workers were sent to work in munitions factories in England. Best known to students for his ‘Abridged Mathematical Tables,’ which ‘had a profound influence on the advancement of engineering education.’

Source : http://www.facilities.usyd.edu.au/documents/docs/cmp_woolley.pdf (page 60)

Australian Library Collections – Publications and Journal articles by Sir Samuel Barraclough
http://librariesaustralia.nla.gov.au/apps/kss;jsessionid=7FC55D769C274627AA8466286DB53616.ajp13e?action=Display&queryid=4&target=freenbd

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One Response to Samuel Barraclough

  1. ken stevenson says:

    Samuel Barraclough was appointed Lecturer in Physics at Sydney Technical College. http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/barraclough-sir-samuel-henry-egerton-5141 Not only did Hargraves http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Hargrave consult with him, Hargraves (and his son who was studying at Syd Tech) consulted Herbert Swain – head of Mech Eng at Syd Tech – there is a photo in Powerhouse of Hargraves and Swain launching a box kite at Stanwell Tops.

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