Edward Hall

Edward Hall (1786 – 1860) banker, newspaper editor and grazier
Edward Hall and five others founded the New South Wales Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge and Benevolence, which added to the colony’s much needed private forms of charity; this society was discontinued in 1818 after he helped to form the Benevolent Society of New South Wales. He also was a founder in 1817 of the New South Wales auxiliary of the British and Foreign Bible Society.

Edward Hall, banker, newspaper editor and grazier, was born on 28 March 1786 in London, one of the six sons of Smith Hall and Jane, née Drewry. He grew up near Falkingham, Lincolnshire, where his father was the manager of a private bank. On 21 December 1810 at St Luke’s Church, London, he married Charlotte, second daughter of Hugh Victor Hall of Portsea.

Hall engaged in religious and social work and so impressed leaders in these fields that their friendships were helpful when he decided to migrate to New South Wales. His application, supported by recommendations from the philanthropist, William Wilberforce, and Sir James Shaw, sheriff of London, was successful. Hall left England in the Friends and arrived in the colony on 10 October 1811, with a letter to Governor Macquarie from Robert Peel, then under-secretary at the Colonial Office.

Hall continued religious and social work, and in 1813 with five others founded the New South Wales Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge and Benevolence, which added to the colony’s much needed private forms of charity; this society was discontinued in 1818 after he helped to form the Benevolent Society of New South Wales. He also was a founder in 1817 of the New South Wales auxiliary of the British and Foreign Bible Society.

Hall’s first notable activity in the public affairs of the colony was his association with the Bank of New South Wales. At a meeting on 5 December 1816 Hall was opening speaker in support of the arguments presented by Judge-Advocate Wylde for the establishment of the bank. On 15 February 1817 an advertisement in the Sydney Gazette invited applications for the situation of cashier and secretary in the new bank from ‘persons of respectable character’. Hall was appointed at a salary of £200, and had to undertake to sleep at the bank every night and never to be out of Sydney after dark. The bank’s premises in Macquarie Place were so small that he had to leave his wife and family on a farm bought at Surry Hills in 1815.

Complete article : http://www.adb.online.anu.edu.au/biogs/A010457b.htm

Australia’s Christian Heritage : The Benevolent Society of New South Wales  https://atributetoaustralianchristians.wordpress.com/2010/11/05/the-benevolent-society-of-new-south-wales/
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